The importance of the Ariosto

I have written about a vessel named the Ariosto before – you can click here to check out the post if you haven’t read it.

On the way to the new world – on board a German immigrant ship, woodcut, 1849

It was common in days past for people from the same village or city to travel together to settle in a new place. This is what proved to be the case for several families traveling from Germany to America on the Ariosto. A total of 37 people emigrated on this ship from the Darmstadt, Hesse region of Germany to the same community in Randolph and Suffield Townships, Portage County, Ohio. I could not locate a picture of the Ariosto, but the ullustration above shows us what life would look like during such an ocean crossing during the 1840’s.

While researching on Ancestry.com, I found a document showing that the Ariosto arrived in the port of New York on 16 Oct 1839 after departing from Antwerp, Belgium. The Ariosto‘s home port was Boston, Massachusetts and her captain was Daniel T. Lothrop.

Captain Lothrop’s family and business papers are now a part of the Baker Library Special Collections housed at the Harvard Business School, Harvard University Repository. The collections consists of shipping papers for the vessels Captain Lothrop sailed, including the Ship Ariosto.

This document listed all arriving passengers and crew members for the ship, Ariosto. On it were listed the following people:

LAST NAMEFIRST NAME AGEBORNSEXOCCUPATION
TRARESMatthes481791MaleFarmer
Elizabeth441795FemaleWife
Agnes161823FemaleGirl
John141825MaleChild
Barbra111828FemaleChild
Peter91830MaleChild
Margaret71832FemaleChild
Sebastian41835MaleChild
KLEINPeter491790MaleFarmer
Barbara461793FemaleWife
Adam211818MaleBlacksmith
John191820MaleBlacksmith
John Adam161823MaleBoy
Elizabeth111828FemaleChild
Peter71832MaleChild
MAYGeorge431796MaleTailor
Elizabeth631776FemaleWife
Catharina231816FemaleGirl
George2/121839MaleChild
KLINEPeter291810MaleFarmer
Margaret261813FemaleWife
Catharina21837FemaleChild
Martin1/121839MaleChild
MAYGeorge431796MaleFarmer
Barbara391800FemaleWife
Illegible111828MaleChild
Barbra41835FemaleChild
ANDESFred.241815MaleShoemaker
Margaret251814FemaleWife
Elisabeth2 /121839FemaleChild
MAYJohn481791MaleFarmer
Margaret**461793FemaleWife
John221817MaleFarmer
Anna Maria191820FemaleWife
George171822MaleBoy
Adam101829MaleBoy
Nicholas1 1/81838MaleBoy
Table showing Andes, Klein/Kline, Knapp, May, and Trares ancestors arriving on the vessel Ariosta. Note that Margaret May ** died at sea 22 September 1839, before the ship arrived in New York from Antwerp.

During my next few posts I’ll talk about how these Ariosto passengers are related to the Knapp clan, and share what became of them after they reached America.

Image Information

Repository: Art Resource. Title: On the way to the new world – on board a German immigrant ship. Website: Immigrant Entreprenuership. Access Date: 12/29/22. Publisher: German Historical Institute. Original Published Date: 7/15/2011. Date of Last Update: 8/7/2018.

This entry was posted in Andes, Antes, Anthes, Ariosto, Emigration/Immigration, Kline/Cline/Klein, May, Portage County, Trares and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The importance of the Ariosto

  1. Michael C. Wise says:

    Thank you for this very good information.

    Like

  2. Manfred Bräuer says:

    Greetings from Heppenheim, Hesse, Germany. As I read, Daniel. T. Lothrop signed the passengers list on 10 Oct 1839.

    The published list should be corrected in the following entries:
    a) May, Elizabeth, 63 y, occupation not wife but widow (she was the mother of George May, 43 y (from Ohio) and Catarina May, 23 y.
    b) Kline, Catharina, daughter of Peter, age not 2 y but 2 1/2 y
    c) May, George, son, illegitible: his name was Nikolaus
    d) May, Nicholas, son of Johan May, age not 1 1/8 y but 1 1/2 y

    From the same parish of St. Peter in Heppenheim were on the ship the families of Martin Musler (Mischler), Martin Bower (Bauer), Martin Grosman, Adam Honnel (Hohenadel), Gerhard Breier (Breuer/Bräuer, am. Brier, Briar, Bryer), Ignatz Kimmer (Kämmerer) and Peter Koob (with Barbara Koob, the later Saint Marianne Cope, 1 1/2 y). Peter Shefer (Schäfer) and Wilhelm Knoll travelled without family with the families from Heppenheim and the surrounding villages.

    Adam Hohenadel and Gerhard Breier (both from Erbach near Heppenheim) also settled in Portage County. In the U.S. Census of 1840, Gerhard Breier is mentioned as Gahart Brier in Randolph Township. Before and after his family are listed the two Knapp families who emigrated in 1831 and 1832, John Kline, Joseph Schrader and his father-in-law Peter Andes. Adam Hohenadel as Honadel is also on the census list of Randolph Township. Gerhard Breiers widow later lived in Jasper County/IL.

    Regards
    Manfred Bräuer

    Like

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